Is Spring Hotting Up?

Robin - Barry CarterA couple of award winning photos from Barry Carter, “The Nuthatch image has got a third place in an international photo contest and the Robin won Best Image on Andy Rouse’s Fotobuzz website and also scooped the members’ votes top position! Have a look at my Barry’s new website, it is in its infancy and trying to concentrate mainly on the birds.

Nuthatch - Barry CarterSpring Hots Up

Andrew Willocks tells me, “The first frogs spawn was seen at Harlow Carr on 8 March, the first summer migrant was a Chiffchaff seen and heard at Harlow Carr on 11 and 13 March.“

Roger Litton took these great photos of frogs at Bachelor Garden pond recently. Sadly I can’t pass on the call frogs make when courting; it’s brilliant, really soothing and calming.

John Stockill spotted a red-tailed bumblebee at Studley Royal on 12 March. Over the last few days there have been a few bumblebees around. Robert Brown reported a good number in a tree full of pussy willow which most probably would be tree bees, the ones that take over bird boxes. John and his family “also spotted curlew and a grey wagtail bobbing about The Strid which was roaring after the rain we’ve recently had. A great walk through the woods noticing spring is just around the corner.”

What signs of spring have you seen?

Common Frog8 - Roger LittonFrog – Roger Litton

Do Otters Eat Fish!

Sightings

Ian Law and his daughter “Lisa spotted an Oystercatcher which was about 100 metres away on a dry stone wall above How Stean Beck on Sunday, 12 March.”

John Stockill saw a birch tree with the fungus piptoporus betulinus growing on it. It’s better known, at least to me, as birch bracket or razor strop fungus. So called because Barbers used to ‘strop’ or sharpen their cut-throat razors on tough, leathery strips cut from the surfaces of these polypores. It only grows on birch trees. The 5,000 year old mummy found in the Tyrol and nicknamed Ötzi the Iceman had two pieces of this fungus on a neck thong, it seems unlikely that their purpose was to sharpen a razor! (First Nature). It is much more likely that it was used in its dried form to carry light from place to place or as tinder when starting a new fire, hence another name for it, Tinder Fungus. In case you were wondering, no it’s not poisonous but is bitter tasting, when cut these polypores have a faint but not unpleasant ‘mushroomy’ odour. Usual warning – only forage fungi from supermarket shelves.

John Wade writes, “Fascinating sighting at Ripley end of the Bilton-Ripley walkway, yesterday, 9 March, a beautiful day, was a bat at 2.40pm. I do not know bats, but the book seems to show it as a pipistrelle. Seems the good weather brought it out. Is it unusual?” Most folk even experts can’t identify bats by sight and usually do so using a bat detector. As John says, it was most likely pipistrelle although which of the three varieties is anyone’s guess. Bats will venture out at any time of the year and I once saw one in Borrowdale at New Year, it was a lovely day and probably a few insects about so hopefully like yours it ate and then returned to sleep, come to think of it some uninterrupted sleep would do me good! To answer John’s question it’s not usual but does occur perhaps because the bat was disturbed or more likely because it just woke up and fancied a look round. Maybe because it was during the day it had been disturbed but they usually are sensible enough to hibernate well away from anywhere humans venture into. I guess other creatures may be more likely to disturb it but disturbance is not the only reason bats wake up. If you have a better theory let me know. John also saw a pair of little owls recently at Nosterfield.

Starling Murmuration - Judith FawcettJudith Fawcett took this great photo of a recent starling murmuration at Nosterfield.

Ken Fackrell writes, “Someone asked about otters taking fish from garden ponds. Yes they do, leaving uneaten bits all over the garden, and even leaving an undamaged fish alive by the side of the pond. That one, at least, recovered.” Ken continues, “Grey wagtails are by the footbridge in Nidd Gorge most mornings now,” and “where are my frogs this year? We normally have dozens from mid-February onwards, but not one this year.” Nice to know grey wagtails are around, my personal suspicions are their numbers are falling. Hope your frogs have arrived by now, let me know if that’s not the case. A number of folk have also asked the same question whilst others have said their frog numbers are better than ever. One such person being Neil Anderson. Let me know what the frog situation is with you, please.

Paul Irving writes, “I’ve also had a female blackcap in the garden for about a fortnight. Mink are decreasing in part it seems to be in conjunction with the return of the Otter, a much larger animal. Otters mainly declined due to organochlorine pesticides (DDT et al) and it has taken a long time for them to return. I am 66 and cannot remember them being common before, although I do remember one being nailed through the head onto a keepers gibbet along the Nidd near Knaresborough as a boy. Many fishermen dislike this resurgence of a natural native predator, perhaps they need reminding that their rainbow trout and carp are non-natives and about ecology. Sea Eagles and Ospreys are never going to predate fish in garden ponds even in rural sites, cats, herons, mink and otter even foxes are much much more likely candidates.” I recall reading an article from the turn of the century (1800 to 1900) by a fisherman saying how pleased he was that otter were returning and ‘holting’ in the Nidd Gorge, the reason for their return was because the Nidd was becoming cleaner because lead mining upstream had declined.

Peter Thomson tells me, “You have probably seen in the HDNS sightings that that I saw a black Mink on 5 Jan and two Otters on the early morning of 6 Feb. Having never seen an otter in the beck before, I was very puzzled as to why they should have been there. They were diving for fish right opposite my house then headed downstream towards the Nidd, which must be about a mile away. Having since read your explanation concerning Otter territories I now understand why they were there but I shall be very surprised if I see them again. Last week there was a Little Grebe in the Beck on Wednesday and again on Saturday which is the first time I have seen one there since 1988. He seemed to be catching plenty of small fish on the Wednesday and a rather larger one on the Saturday morning which I was able to photograph from my bedroom window. I have had three different Chaffinches with the papilloma virus on my garden feeders; the two which were worst affected have now disappeared. As for the rest of the garden birds, they all seem to be pairing up and looking for nesting sites. I watched a Tree Sparrow taking dead leaves into a nest box which has been occupied by Great Tits for the previous two years; it will be interesting to see who ends up as this year’s tenant. There has been a family of three Roe Deer regularly roaming the area and a covey of up to 20 Pheasants including a black one which has been around for a few years (if it is the same one).”

News

Two more buzzards shot dead in North Yorkshire

Events

Harrogate District Biodiversity Action Group AGM Saturday, 1 April at RHS Harlow Carr Wolfson Room, Bramall Learning Centre, Crag Lane, Harrogate HG3 1QB 10.00am for guided tour of RHS Harlow Carr Gardens, 10.45 – 12.30 for meeting

Frack Free Harrogate District – Meeting Thursday, 30 March, Friends Meeting House, 12a Queen Parade, Harrogate HG1 5PP. All Welcome.

Zero Carbon Harrogate Tomorrow Demain the film – Showing solutions, telling a feel-good story… … this may be the best way to solve the ecological, economical and social crises that our countries are going through. Demain has had a phenomenal impact in Europe. Read Moreand view the trailer 7.30pm, Monday, 20 March, St Mark’s Church, Leeds Road

Harrogate and District Naturalists Society

Kevin Walker will review the history of recording the flora of the HDNS area over the past 150 years with a focus on the current flora and how it has changed. Wed, 22 March 19:30 – 21:30. St. Robert’s Centre, 2/3 Robert Street, Harrogate at 7.30 p.m. visitor’s fee is £3.00.

Harrogate RSPB Group

Visit to RSPB Fairburn Ings, Saturday, 25 March. Meet 10am Fairburn Ings Car Park or 9am at Trinity for car share

Nidderdale Bird Club

Monday, 20 March (Evening). Investigating Wildlife Crime: a presentation by Howard Jones, RSPB Investigations Officer.

Saturday, 25 March. Bolton-on-Swale Lake: an early spring visit to a former sand and gravel quarry off the A1 with wildfowl and woodland birds.

Reserve Sightings

Nosterfield Nature Reserve

Recent sightings from the Nosterfield complex via Twitter include: the Starling murmuration, @NosterfieldLNR tonight plus chiffchaff, short-eared owl, smew, avocet, blacktailed godwit, pintail , hare, little egret, white-fronted geese and a pinkfooted goose, goldeneye, and a possible rough leg buzzard large white patch on rump. A request, LADYBRIDGE is a privately owned working farm. Please can those viewing from Carthorpe road stay well clear of farm/quarry entrances. Thanks!

Sightings from Harrogate Naturalists Society Sightings Page,

David Gilroy, “My first Chiffchaff calling this morning – outside Betty’s in Harrogate town centre! “
Ian Webster, “Masham, riverside. 3. Kingfisher and 1. Dipper.”
Peter Thomson, “Chiffchaff in scrub on bank of Oak Beck opposite Knox Mill. This is the same place and the same date that I first saw one in 2015.”
Mike Metcalfe, “Sand Martin 1 at Staveley today, (12-3-17) over east lagoon at 16.35”
Mike Smithson, “A chiffchaff at Goldsborough this morning next to the River Nidd. My first of the year. Also two fieldfares, a goldcrest and a pair of shelduck on the farmer’s pond, Midgeley Lane.”
Joe Fryer, “A snipe on Dallowgill area. Also 2 golden plover, one nearly in summer plumage male 1 female 1, green woodpecker 1, red kite 3 +buzzards. Plenty of red grouse.
P & M Robinson, “First chiffchaff of the year heard and seen this morning on Abbey Road in Knaresborough.”

RSPB Fairburn Ings. Recent Reports: 3rd- 8th March

White-fronted Goose 3 on flashes most of week. Barnacle Goose Single throughout; Wigeon c125 on flashes. Pintail Present throughout in small numbers. Smew 2 until 3rd. Cormorant Well developed young in nests. Bittern. Three on 3rd. Male booming on western lagoon occasionally. Great White Egret Single throughout. Red Kite 1-2 Daily. Oystercatcher 6 Daily. Curlew Max 21 seen daily. Snipe Up to 40 recently on Big Hole and Main Bay. Kingfisher Occasional at kingfisher screen and down Cut. Peregrine Two reported most dates from flashes. Nuthatch 1-2 regular on feeders. Goldcrest Max 4 on 6th. Cetti’s Warbler Now three singing intermittently. Chiffchaff Single on 7th. Treecreeper Pairs regularly at VC and down Cut lane .occasionally in song! Fieldfare Daily. Max 125 on 7th. Siskin 8 on 8th. 

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