Acrobatic Feeders & Has Spring Sprung?

staring-adrian-mosleyStarling – Adrian Mosley

Acrobatic Feeders

Adrian Mosley has kindly sent some great photos of of acrobatic feeders on our garden feeders here on Jennyfield. “It has taken the Siskins some time to appear in numbers this year but this week we had 9 at one time (23rd Feb) on the feeders. I also had a surprise visitor to our garden a Sparrowhawk sitting on the garden seat looking at the feeders longingly – but the birds had flown.”

My grateful thanks to all of you who have thanked me for resuming my blog, much appreciated. Please share with your friends and fellow wildlife watchers. Also see my monthly blog at How Stean Gorge.

Signs of Spring

Rick and Trisha Brewis have already seen “dogs mercury and celandine out in full flower in the Nidd Gorge and flowering blackthorn out in blossom down Bilton Hall Drive! How early is that?” Nowt surprises me any more, when will we get winter this year? I used to enjoy long walks on frozen ground; trudging through thick mud is no alternative. I seem to recall in previous years that not only did we have a Harrogate crocus fortnight the second week in March but also yellow crocuses (croci?) always came first. Now there are hardly yellow ones on the Stray, but loads of purple and white ones.

Meanwhile Jackie reckons that the snowdrops are one of the best displays for years and she saw a red admiral whilst out walking last week. As I write I’ve just received a weather warning for ice, so blame me.

John Wade saw his “first curlew of year on 17/2. On the road to Lindley. There was only one. Earliest I have ever seen one. Robert Brown also reports seeing curlew on their breeding grounds. Also a nice flock of about 20 lapwings. Six or so bramblings still regularly in our garden.”

house-sparrow-adrain-mosleyHouse Sparrow and Goldfinch – Adrian Mosley

Philip Woffinden writes, “The Mallinson estate, Harrogate, frogs have been busy early this year, with frogspawn first being noticed in my pond on 21 February. This compares with 17 March last year, 16 March in 2015, 6 March 2014, 4 March 2013, 26 February 2012, 1 March 2011 and 10 March 2010, so it breaks the record for earliness. The frogs were first apparent in the pond on 16 February, so the ‘boys’ may not have had to wait as long this year before they were able to attract a female with their croaking.”

Doug Simpson, “Had three singing Skylarks at Scargill last Saturday (18/02).”

This one has a mixture of winter visitors and spring signs from Andrew Willocks, “I thought that I would pass on a few sightings from Harlow Carr for February 2017. We had the first Bumble Bee seen this year in the gardens by one of the gardeners Peter Duechar on 20 February with a Peacock butterfly and also the first Curlew was seen flying over the gardens on territory all on the same day. The Waxwings are still coming into roost most evenings into the gardens at Harlow Carr from 4.00pm, they can be viewed in the arboretum at the far end of the gardens, the number ranges from 30 – 60.” Sorry but no guarantee that the waxwings will stay much longer.

Andy Hanby reports whooper swans and pink-footed geese at Nosterfield Nature Reserve. Sorry sand martin report was my error, one hasn’t been seen in the area yet.

What signs of spring have you seen?

Red Kites Poisoned

The Raptor Persecution Website has revealed that two red kites found dead in Nidderdale were poisoned and the Police are appealing for information and warning about the dangers of illegal bird of prey poisoning. The two red kites were found poisoned in Nidderdale in 2016 one near Pateley bridge and the second near Bouthwaite, the second with as many as eight different poisons found following tests. Officers are appealing for information about the two incidents, and warning members of the public about the dangers of this illegal practice. Hard-hitting posters urging people to report suspected wildlife poisoning are being distributed across the county. If you find a mammal or bird that you believe has been poisoned, please do not touch it, as poisons can transfer through skin contact. Also keep youngsters and pets well away. Make a note of the location, including GPS co-ordinates if possible, and anything else that is around or near the animal, and contact the police immediately. Call me naive but do you think ‘hard hitting posters’ will do the trick? What do you think? I shudder every time I see a bird of prey, of any type, near moorland and pheasant shoots. It’s surely time more was done to protect our wildlife and licensing all shoots may be one way of dealing with these illegal activities. Anyone with information about the poisoning of the red kites found in Nidderdale should contact North Yorkshire Police on 101, quoting reference number 12160043415, or email ruraltaskforce@northyorkshire.pnn.police.uk.

Buzzard Shot

North Yorkshire Police report an incident in which a Buzzard was shot in the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. A dead buzzard was found on 1 February 2017 in an area called High Skelding, near the village of Grantley. It was in a small coniferous plantation close to where the Ripon Rowel footpath crosses the upper River Skell. If you have any information about this crime please contact North Yorkshire Police on 101. After being connected to North Yorkshire Police select option 1 and quote reference number 12170018791 when passing on information. Alternatively contact the investigating officer PC820 Hickson by email: bill.hickson@northyorkshire.pnn.police.uk

How To Make A Wildflower Meadow

Visit Friends of The Earth for information on how to grow a wildflower meadow.

siskin-adrian-mosleySiskin – Adrian Mosley

Wildlife Meetings

The Pinewoods Conservation Group is holding their AGM on from 7pm on Thursday, 9 March at The Green Hut, Harlow Ave, Harrogate HG2 0AS. There are plans for Harrogate Borough Council to lease 4 acres of The Pinewoods to Harrogate Spa Water Limited (HSWL). HSWL are then planning to build an extension of up to 5,000 square meters to their current plant on this land. The planning application also includes a proposal to create new landscaping and footpaths within the area with a percentage left open for public access. See here for more info and show your support for the PCG at their AGM.

Do Otters Eat Fish!

Paul Brothers writes, “I know of both dogs and cats that will eat fish, taken straight out of garden ponds. Netting may not be too much of a deterrent to them. I appreciate that a dog may not be able to get into the garden, but a cat certainly would. There was talk of a sea eagle coming into a garden pond near to me a couple of years back. Though the chances of that are pretty slim I would suspect. Osprey and other such birds are also unlikely, but cannot be ruled out. Mink could be another culprit and their numbers are increasing since they escaped from the mink farms.” I still reckon that otters are most likely to raid ponds but agree other wildlife could also do so. Regarding mink it was once considered that otter numbers were depleted because of the escaped mink. This is now considered unlikely to be the reason and polluted waters are a much more likely reason. Following Brexit of course we can now pollute our waters as much as we like so maybe our river life is in danger once again. Mink are much smaller than otters and unlikely to displace them and I believe as a consequence, coupled with culling, they are in fact reducing in numbers. Does anyone have any hard facts on this, please? I recognise of course that our water could be much cleaner than it currently is, it’s just better than it was.

chaffinch-with-fringilla-papilloma-virus-conrad-plowmanChaffinch with fringilla papilloma virus – Conrad Plowman

Conrad Plowman tells me, “I was interested to read of the depredations of an otter in fish ponds recently – in the past week remains of goldfish have been found in a neighbouring garden, within a few metres of the Knaresborough railway viaduct. There is easy access to the ponds from the Nidd. These are almost certainly as a result of an otter (or possibly, but less likely, a mink) attack, during the night. We haven’t seen otters in this stretch for about three years, but will certainly keep a look out. I have attached a photo of a chaffinch with fringilla papilloma virus. We don’t get many chaffinches on our feeders, but all that we see, both male and female, are affected to some extent. The method of transmission seems to be unclear, but bird to bird infection must occur. There seems to be nothing that can be done except trying to keep good hygiene around the feeders, although it is very difficult to do this on the ground. They generally seem to manage to feed without difficulty. I would be interested to know if other readers see this virus locally.

Sightings

Roger Graville asks, “You asked about sparrows in your latest article. We have always had plenty in our garden in Arncliffe Road, but after an enforced temporary move away for a few months we thought many birds may have stopped coming to our then empty feeders. Having returned home just before Christmas we are glad to say that although the variety of birds is only slowly building up again, the flock of sparrows turned up virtually straight away to welcome us back home, and we now regularly have between 10 and 20 as before.” I’m pleased that Roger’s sparrow numbers are doing well. I suspect that there are sadly fewer visiting my garden though. What’s happening near you?

Events

Harrogate Futures Forum:

Growing Pains or Grasping the Nettle… Do we need British horticulture?

Mike Prest of Knaresborough Horticultural Society will share some of his extensive experience in this sector. Presentation and discussion 16 March at 7:30pm, Friends Meeting House, Queen Parade, Harrogate. Admission Free – All Welcome – Refreshments Available

Harrogate Futures Forum presents a series of debates about the ways in which current issues may impact the Harrogate, Knaresborough and Ripon areas. Contact: Shan Oakes shan@voice-international.net

Harrogate and District Naturalists’ Society Birds in a Cage, Derek Niemann. This is the story of an obsessive quest behind barbed wire. Through their shared love of birds, a group of British POWs overcome hunger, hardship, fear and stultifying boredom. Their experiences leave them scarred, but set them on a path to becoming greats of the conservation movement. This tale is not just about birds or war, but about the human spirit. Derek takes us through the despair, the suffering, the hope, and the laughter, showing us how a love of the natural world can help us in good times – and in bad. You don’t need to be an ornithologist to enjoy this talk! When: Wed March 8 19:30 – 21:30 St. Robert’s Centre, 2/3 Robert Street, Harrogate

Nidderdale Bird Club Friday, 10 March, RSPB RSPB Leighton Moss, Lancashire: a trip to the south shore of the Ribble Estuary, looking for geese, ducks and waders.Please note this was originally RSPB Marshside.

High Batts Nature Reserve Autumn/winter lectures High Batts Nature Reserve runs an Autumn and Winter Programme of talks and slideshows. These are open to members and to non-members and the venue is The Golden Lion in Ripon, commencing 7.30 pm. Entry costs £2.00. When: 6th March 2017: Roger Parrish: “Birding the Dots” – welcome to Texas.

Reserve Sightings

Nosterfield Nature Reserve

Recent sightings, from twitter include a fantastic Starling murmuration plus bittern, barn owl, white-fronts and smew, great-crested grebe, gadwell.

Sightings from Harrogate Naturalists’ Society Sightings Page,

Will Rich: Two Buzzards circling over New Park
Ian Webster: House by the dam wall 4 Crossbill.
David Gilroy: A female Blackcap in the garden today, along with regular Bullfinches.
Will Rich: Male and female Blackcaps in my New Park garden, Tawny Owls hooting in the early hours on a regular basis and a pair of Bullfinches.
Alan Medforth: Two Dippers with nesting material, between High and Low Bridge, Knaresborough. PLUS One Grey Wagtail, Two Buzzards and heard a Green Woodpecker.
Paul Irving: Allerton Lakes: Glaucous Gull 1st winter, Herring Gull c400, Great BB Gull c150. European White-fronted Goose 17, Mute Swan 15, Red Kite 3 Redwing 150.
Lingham Lake: Little Egret 2, Pintail 3, Dunlin 7, Redshank 10, Ringed Plover 1
Nosterfield NR: Linnet c150, Peregrine 1 adult female
High Batts NR: Chaffinch c60, Brambling 3, Kingfisher 1, Little Egret 1, Buzzard 3

RSPB Fairburn Ings.Recent Reports: 16-23 February

Pink-footed Goose 5 by New Flash on 23rd. White-fronted Goose 3 on north flashes most of week. Barnacle Goose Single throughout. Shelduck 53 max – present daily. Pintail Present throughout in small numbers. Smew Male and redhead throughout. Bittern Single on 21st & 22nd. Great White Egret Single throughout. Red Kite 1-2 on most days. Marsh Harrier Male on 18th. Oystercatcher 4 by 23rd. Curlew Max 25 see daily. Snipe Max 39 on 21st. Woodcock Singles on 14th and 15th. Common Snipe Upto 40 recently on Big Hole and Main Bay. Kingfisher Occasional at kingfisher screen. Peregrine Two reported most dates from flashes. Nuthatch 1-2 regular on feeders. Cetti’s Warbler Single heard on 19th. Chiffchaff 2 on 17th by Parker’s Pond. Treecreeper Pairs regularly at VC and down Cut Lane occasionally in song!. Starling c5K still at roost on lagoons. Stonechat Three on 18th. Grey Wagtail Single on 15th.

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